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Test bench | Toyota Tundra 2022: measured ambitions

(San Antonio, Texas) Rather than seeking a hypothetical integration among the elite of large pickup trucks, the Toyota Tundra is digging its own way. So far, it has not done so badly even if it remains the small stone in the shoe of American brands.

The fortress was considered impregnable. It still is even if the Japanese automobile industry believed, for a moment, to conquer it.

PHOTO NATHAN LEACH-PROFFER, SUPPLIED BY TOYOTA

Toyota has developed a specific architecture (code name TNGA GA-F) which, in the long term, will be shared in particular with the future Lexus LX 600.

The insolent success of the American manufacturers even prompted, in Canada, Nissan to surrender and abandon the commercialization of the Titan. For its part, Toyota is (finally) splitting a new generation, which aims to satisfy the core of fans of the brand.

The rise of pickup trucks – which have long since ceased to be vehicles reserved for transporting logs and hay bales – partly reflects the same phenomenon as that of SUVs. Indeed, some motorists orient their choice taking into account the practice, even irregular, of an outdoor activity.

PHOTO NATHAN LEACH-PROFFER, SUPPLIED BY TOYOTA

On the road, we immediately note a progress on the side of filtering irregularities in the roadway and suspensions, which still stamp a little, but without affecting comfort however.

The Tundra has not given up all hope of breaking out of anonymity. To achieve this, Toyota’s hopes rest on its mastery of hybrid technology combined with the durability, reliability and robustness of its pickup truck.

The 2022 Toyota Tundra at a glance

Price range: $ 47,010 to $ 64,250 (2021)
(the prices of the new generation will be communicated in a few weeks.)
Visible in dealerships: December

WE love

Greatly improved ride comfort
User-friendly and reasoned infotainment system
Efficient powertrains

We like less

Few innovations after such a long gestation
Lack of linearity in steering assistance
Late and reduced availability of the hybrid engine

Our verdict

A van for insiders

A past master in this type of bodywork on a smaller model (the Tacoma), Toyota has a playing card. Having been completely reengineered, the Tundra should be able to argue its case better. For example, by drawing attention to the sobriety of its fuel consumption and its improved ride comfort.

We erase and we start again

No one will be surprised to learn that this third generation does not recover any component of the previous one. Toyota has developed a specific architecture (code name TNGA GA-F) which, in the long term, will be shared in particular with the future Lexus LX 600 revealed a few days ago in preview. The main element to remember here is the presence, at the rear only, of coil or pneumatic springs (depending on the declination) instead of leaves. However, these remain in place on the TRD Pro version.

PHOTO NATHAN LEACH-PROFFER, SUPPLIED BY TOYOTA

Little by little, we notice the negligence or the conservatism (depending on) of the designers of this van. Especially in terms of storage, tips, attention to detail or downright quality of materials (delivered SR and SR5).

To drive this new platform, Toyota drops the 5.7L V8 in favor of a 3.5L V6 supercharged by two turbochargers. With the exception of his stentorian voice, no one will regret removing this lazy V8 except when it came to emptying its gas tank.

The V6 which replaces it turns out to be more dynamic and stronger. More flexible too, even with a load stuck to the back. More importantly, the consumption at the end of this first grip appeared more reasonable, for a van of this size, of course.

PHOTO NATHAN LEACH-PROFFER, SUPPLIED BY TOYOTA

2022 Toyota Tundra rear seat overview

The presence of a properly staged 10-speed automatic gearbox helps to quench thirst for the propellant.

The Tundra promises to do even better with the hybrid version of the same engine (see Technical sheet). We already regret that its availability is limited to the most luxurious versions while Ford, for example, extends it to its entire range.

PHOTO NATHAN LEACH-PROFFER, SUPPLIED BY TOYOTA

The double cab offers the choice of a 6.5 or 8.1 ft box. With the CrewMax cabin, two lengths also: 5.5 or 6.5 ft.

On the road, we immediately note a progress on the side of filtering irregularities in the roadway and suspensions, which still stamp a little, but without affecting comfort however. The steering that some will consider a little firm, and this, regardless of the driving parameter chosen (Eco, Normal or Sport), offers good steering, but the lack of linearity of its assistance annoys a little. This is amplified by the presence of a lane-keeping assistant. The braking, easy to modulate, is powerful enough to immobilize this vehicle weighing more than two tons.

PHOTO NATHAN LEACH-PROFFER, SUPPLIED BY TOYOTA

The steering that some will consider a little firm, and this, regardless of the chosen driving parameter (Eco, Normal or Sport), offers good heading hold.

As for towing capacity and payload, the Tundra naturally does better (the opposite would have been shocking) than its predecessor, but still lags behind the competition. On the other hand, for these consumers who are in their first experience of towing, this Japanese van inaugurates a new driving aid. This makes it possible to simplify maneuvers in reverse, as long as what is attached behind points in the desired direction. All you have to do is program the system and the vehicle will take care of the rest.

Eyes on the big screen

The 14-inch screen (unfortunately offered on the more expensive versions) is without a doubt the first thing you notice when you climb aboard the Tundra. Once this “distraction” is over, we gradually notice the negligence or conservatism (depending on) of the designers of this van. Especially in terms of storage, tips, attention to detail or downright quality of materials (delivered SR and SR5).

PHOTO NATHAN LEACH-PROFFER, SUPPLIED BY TOYOTA

The 14-inch screen (unfortunately offered on the more expensive versions) is without a doubt the first thing you notice when you climb aboard the Tundra.

On a more positive note, let us retain the comfort of the seats in the front as in the back and the quality of the interface of the infotainment system. This is significantly faster, works admirably on both major platforms (Apple and Android) and allows remote updates.

As for the tipper, Toyota is revising its offer so that it meets consumer expectations. The double cab offers the choice of a 6.5 or 8.1 ft box. With the CrewMax cabin, two lengths also: 5.5 or 6.5 ft.

PHOTO NATHAN LEACH-PROFFER, SUPPLIED BY TOYOTA

Part of the orders for the Toyota Tundra 2022

Obviously, this Tundra completely eclipses its predecessor. True to its positioning, it represents an alternative to the big names in the category which, in several respects, all prove to be more versatile and clever.

Spaced overhauls

PHOTO PROVIDED BY TOYOTA

Toyota T-100 1993

30 years ago, Toyota for the first time attacked the market of large pickup trucks, American preserve. First with the T-100 (our photo), then the Tundra. During these 30 years, this model has only been renewed three times. This is little. For comparison, Ford has revisited the F Series six times during the same period.

Hybrid engine

PHOTO PROVIDED BY TOYOTA

The engine of the Toyota Tundra hybrid

The hybrid engine of the Tundra will not appear in the catalog until spring 2022. Only the most upscale versions will be entitled to it. Also, at the time of writing, Toyota had still not communicated the amount that the consumer will be called upon to pay to retain his services or the savings (fuel consumption) that it will allow the pump. On the technical level, note that the Tundra encases the electric motor between the engine and the gearbox to preserve the smoothness of the gear changes. This power unit is powered by a 1.87 kWh nickel metal hydride battery housed under the rear seat.

Technical sheet

Engines:
3.5L DOHC Turbocharged V6 (i-Force): 389 hp @ 5,200 rpm, 479 lb-ft of torque @ 2,400 rpm 3.5L Turbocharged Hybrid V6 (i-Force Max): 437 hp @ 5,200 rpm, 583 lb-ft of torque at 2400 rpm Weight (minimum-maximum): 2311 kg to 2805 kg
Ground clearance (minimum-maximum): 236.2 mm – 238.7 mm Maximum towing capacity: 5,443 kg
Gearbox: 10-speed automatic Drive mode: 4 x 4
Tires: 265 / 75R18 (SR5); 265 / 60R20 (Limited, Platinum, 1794 Edition); 285 / 65R18 (TRD Pro)
Fuel tank capacity: 85 L – 121.8 L (optional) Recommended gasoline: regular
Consumption: 12.8 L / 100 km (V6 gasoline)
Wheelbase: 3700.7mm (4180.8mm)
Length: (5933 mm)
Height: 1981 mm (2072.6 mm for the TRD PRO)
Width: 2032 mm (excluding exterior mirrors)

The dimensions listed correspond to the Limited CrewMax version with 5.5 ‘body.

Share your experience

Press will soon publish the test of the following vehicles: Audi A3, Ford Escape, Infiniti QX60, Nissan Frontier and Toyota 86 / Subaru BRZ. If you own one of these vehicles, we would love to hear from you about your experience.

What Toyota Tundra Owners Say

A story to tell

I am the original proud owner of a 2007 Toyota Tundra Double Cad 5.7 SR5 4 x 4, with 260,000 km on the clock, which I still own! I will tell you my little story with this vehicle.

I was feverish at the release of this generation in 2007, because it had several advantages and innovations compared to the competition […]. On the other hand, the three Americans have evolved a lot since then compared to Toyota, which has done nothing important in 15 years (2007-2021)!

Since day 1, it’s our family vehicle. I have done 80,000 km with a 7000-8000 lb trailer and have crossed the mainland twice. My wife and four children have always had their place on board. […]. The reliability was very good with all the components, very durable, everything is original. The only components that have been changed apart from the brakes / exhaust / tires are the starter motor and the radiator. There is also this emergency brake which has not worked for 10 years. […]

I have to be part of the 5% (?) Of owners who use their truck for anything it can do (off-road in Moab, towing, two motorcycles in the box, etc.). Personally, I believe that fuel consumption will only appear outrageous in the eyes of those consumers who buy a pickup truck for “just in case”.

– Martin Heppell

Desolate consumption

The first pickup truck in my life as a motorist, the Tundra has been very helpful to me. This vehicle has so far proven to be extremely reliable. A quality that cannot be found in the competition. Despite my general satisfaction with this product, I am particularly shocked at its consumption and the breath it takes to my heart when I have to tow my trailer.

– Jacques Danault

Reliability above all

I got a 2018 Tundra not because it was the finest, prettiest or strongest, just because it was the most reliable in its class. You should know that this vehicle is one of my working tools. But reliability is not the only excuse. Its V8 engine probably sounds great, but doesn’t have a lot of heart and fuel consumption (15.6 L / 100 km) is mind-boggling. The Toyota does not appear to me to be as functional as the other models in the category for professional use (storage) or very technologically avant-garde. In its defense, it must be said that this model has not been renewed for a long time. No doubt the new generation will correct the situation.

– Gerald Morel

 

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